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Consumer confidence is climbing. Do you feel more confident in the economy?

  1. Yes
  2. No
 
 
 
 
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(30)

questioner

Aug-07-14 12:35 PM

cont

The public seems to have moved beyond the plaintive cry of 'feel our pain' to the more angry pronouncement of 'you are causing our pain.

While hiring has picked up and job openings are at a seven-year high, growth in inflation-adjusted wages and family income has been distressingly slow. The Census Bureau says the income of the median, or typical, American family in 2012 was $51,017, or about the same as in 1995 adjusting for inflation. Median family income is about 8% below 2007 levels.

In the survey, roughly a quarter of adults said they or their child has more than $5,000 in student-loan debt, and 25% said someone in their house had to take a second job just to pay the bills.

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questioner

Aug-07-14 12:14 PM

Poll finds widespread economic anxiety The Wall Street Journal August 6, 2014

Americans are registering record levels of anxiety about the opportunities available to younger generations and are pessimistic about the nation's long-term prospects, directing their blame at elected leaders in Washington.

76% of adults lack confidence that their children's generation will have a better life than they do—an all-time high. Some 71% of adults think the country is on the wrong track, a leap of 8 points from a June survey, and 60% believe the U.S. is in a state of decline.

What's more, seven in 10 adults blamed the malaise more on Washington leaders than on any deeper economic trends, and 79% expressed some level of dissatisfaction with the American political system.

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WatchDog

Aug-06-14 12:56 PM

"Ability to pass a drug test. America must be Stoner Nation, because this seemingly simple requirement eliminates half of all applicants for manufacturing jobs, by some estimates."

And Q, Colorado is learning this the hard way. The just some of the things these die hard illegal drug substance pushers don't take into account in the big picture and long term.

They may have legalized it but employer's don't have to tolerate it. Weed is not like alcohol. It can stay in a system for up to two weeks.

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Numnudz

Aug-02-14 5:28 AM

Unemployment ticked up because of those who gave up are now looking for work again. These people are not counted in the U-6 numbers. REal unemployment over 15%.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 1:30 PM

Disagreer (or "fan"):

There is absolutely nothing in the manufacturing article anyone could possibly disagree with. It should make everyone happy.

How 'bout you read or think before clicking?

You can disagree all you want this time, because I'm gonna tell you, I pity anyone in your relationship sphere--when you get upset you just keep going nastily into other unrelated areas, relentlessly. If anyone of the opposite sex who knows you reads this, I'd warn them off you--you seem to have the personality of an abuser.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:35 AM

cont

Labor costs are still the biggest contributor to the overall cost of many goods and services, and they have, not surprisingly, been stagnant as employers benefit from a large pool of surplus labor. Average pay has risen by less than 2% per year since 2008, while many companies have been cutting, rather than expanding, benefits.

If the latest pay gains stick, however, companies will try to pass on their own higher costs to consumers in the form of higher prices. That’s the kind of inflation the Fed worries about...the arrival of legitimate inflation could also force the Fed to rein in its super-easy monetary policy sooner than expected, which could rattle financial markets and undermine a growing sense of optimism about the economy.

Anyway, I'd say the No's have nailed it on this poll.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:28 AM

and back to current subject:

Inflation may have arrived — the worrisome kind, not the manufactured kind.

Since the Federal Reserve started “printing money” in 2008, inflation hawks have warned of runaway price increases that could overrun the economy. Those have largely been false alarms...

But new government data provide a genuine reason to worry. Labor costs rose by 0.7% in the second quarter, the biggest jump since right before the recession started in 2008. Economists had been expecting a more modest gain of 0.5%. Pay is hardly exploding, but if the value of pay and benefits continues to grow at a faster pace, it could cause the kind of inflation that tends to be lasting — and trigger the biggest change in Fed policy since the recession began.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:24 AM

cont

There was more on all those points, but that was the most informative article I've read--now if we could just get the messages across and get parents, teachers and kids on board.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:24 AM

cont

Dependability. The ability to show up for work on time — every day — is another quality that’s surprisingly uncommon. That’s why a low-paying job flipping burgers or manning a cash register can help land a better job in manufacturing.

Vocational training or better. A dependable, drug-free high-school grad might earn $10 to $15 per hour at an entry-level manufacturing job, with pay rising along with more experience and on-the-job training. But pay will obviously be higher still for workers who show up with specialized training or certifications.

Familiarity with manufacturing.

A willingness to forgo college. The types of high school students likely to do well in manufacturing — strong performers with a good work ethic — also tend to be good candidates for college. For determined workers, manufacturing may once again be a worthwhile alternative to college

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:20 AM

cont

“You don’t need to go to college to make a lot of money,” says Vicki Holt, CEO of Proto Labs (PRLB), which specializes in the rapid production of parts for other manufacturers’ prototypes. “You can go to a two-year school and be making $80,000 by the time you’re 21.”

That’s no cakewalk, however. Here are six things required to get a good manufacturing job these days:

Ability to pass a drug test. America must be Stoner Nation, because this seemingly simple requirement eliminates half of all applicants for manufacturing jobs, by some estimates.

Twelfth grade math and English capability. Working with the computerized equipment in many factories requires an understanding of algebra and the ability to do basic computations. Manufacturing workers increasingly operate as teams, making it important to communicate effectively.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:17 AM

cont

shortage of welders, electricians, machinists, press operators and metalworkers, which means people in those fields enjoy something unusual in today’s economy: strong job security and the ability to command decent pay.

The shortage of skilled manufacturing workers is partly due to the sharp decline in U.S. manufacturing during the past 15 years. That led many high schools to axe vocational programs, while teenagers and their parents began to see college as the only likely pathway to a middle-class lifestyle. But manufacturing has begun to bounce back since total employment bottomed out in 2010. There are now about 12.1 million manufacturing workers in the United States, with some forecasters expecting a broader resurgence due to low U.S. energy costs, rising labor rates in other countries and the higher skill levels required to work with robots and computers.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:16 AM

wasn't there a question about this not too long ago?

The U.S. manufacturing sector, once a vast network of assembly lines churning out every imaginable product, has evolved into a specialized and highly efficient industry focused on goods that can’t be built cheaper or better someplace else. There are good jobs in manufacturing — the kind able to finance a comfortable middle-class lifestyle. But there are far fewer than there used to be, and many workers who might have been qualified to man an assembly line 25 years ago lack the skills manufacturers require today.

A recent survey of manufacturing firms by Accenture (ACN) found there’s a “severe shortage of manufacturing skills in the United States.” Only about 20% of manufacturing jobs now are unskilled positions any able-bodied worker can fill. The rest require vocational training, an associate’s degree or certifications that can take years to acquire. Accenture and other analysts say there’s a particular shortage of welders, el

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:13 AM

Okay, I don't totally get all that, but it doesn't sound as tho investors have confidence.

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:12 AM

cont

Ross pointed out that on a 12-month chart a rounded base of support and broken trend sets the stage for a sharp move higher to the 21 level, but stressed that the long-term weekly chart is what should have equity investors concerned.

“I want you to focus on that 200-week moving average which comes in around 17.75. We haven’t had a weekly close above the 200-week in over 2½ years. The last two times we did close above that level, back in 2010 it corresponded with a 17 percent decline in the S&P 500, 2011 a 21 percent decline in the S&P 500. That could take the S&P down to 1,560,” he said, which is around a 20 percent decline. “With a break above that 17.75 level you want to watch out for stocks.”

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questioner

Aug-01-14 10:11 AM

CNBC /Talking Numbers /Beware of more volatility/ 17 hours ago

Thursday’s selloff in stocks sent the smell of fear trickling across the markets.

The CBOE Volatility Index, also known as the VIX or ‘fear index,’ jumped to its highest level since April, and had its best two-day stretch since the start of the year. In fact, while the stock market closed the month in the red, the VIX was up more than 45 percent—its biggest monthly increase since July 2011.

Auerbach Grayson’s Richard Ross, who has been bearish on the overall market for some time, said the charts are screaming for more volatility. “Stocks are in grave danger here and I’m looking for volatility to surge higher, not grind higher.”

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Numnudz

Aug-01-14 5:56 AM

Yup.

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questioner

Jul-31-14 11:35 AM

You two coming to breakfast Mon? 7:00 Bob Evans

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WatchDog

Jul-31-14 10:02 AM

Ladybug sez: "And what is congress working on today ? Tax reform,something to eliminate tax inversions, a road funding bill ,VA , bill to address the border problem ,export import bank funding bill to help prevent loss of jobs to American buss, NO"

Don't forget the Democrat representative and his bill that wants to change the name of a fish called "asian carp" because he thinks it's offensive to some!

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WatchDog

Jul-31-14 9:57 AM

"And to think they deserve 5 weeks off to boot."

Ladybug, NOTHING prevents you from filing a petition to Congress to change their 5 week recess that occurs every year.

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WatchDog

Jul-31-14 9:48 AM

Confident? A 17 trillion dollar debt? Crisis at the borders? Crisis in the middle east? Russia playing russian roulette with Obama? A healthcare system on the brink of collapsing? No jobs? The population is growing? Our national food resources are at the weakest point they have been in 23 years? Our gas tax revenues are nearly depleted? Our gas prices at the pump are high and have not decreased and Obama is toying with higher gas taxes for infrastructure repairs? Natural gas and electric prices have never come down? Expected to go higher.

Confident? For real? Is this a joke?

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ladybug

Jul-30-14 3:47 PM

I think these people need to sue themselves.

And to think they deserve 5 weeks off to boot.

Anybody else get that much time. And this doesn't count all the other breaks

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Goldbeagle

Jul-30-14 11:17 AM

Absolutely NO!!!

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Goldbeagle

Jul-30-14 11:17 AM

Absolutely NO!!!

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Goldbeagle

Jul-30-14 11:17 AM

Absolutely NO!!!

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Goldbeagle

Jul-30-14 11:15 AM

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