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OUR READERS WRITE...

November 11, 2012
Salem News

Layne's family says thanks

To the editor: The family of Layne Jones, who was hit by a car while trick-or-treating in Lisbon on Halloween, is thankful for all the kindness that came our way and Layne's way.

He has recovered nicely and we are grateful that a tragedy did not occur.

We would like to especially thank the following people and organizations: Lisbon Police Dept., Lincoln Way residents, neighbors along Brookfield Avenue, Alayna Schuster and Mrs. Shaffer's second graders at Crestview Elementary for the wonderful get well cards, Layne's Headstart class in Lisbon, the KLG paramedics, the first responders and the staff at St. Elizabeth Hospital in Youngstown. Also, certainly to our family and friends.

KEVIN JONES, KRISTIN GRACE, LAYNE JONES AND LYDIA JONES,

Lisbon

Upset with Salem FD

To the editor:

I moved to Salem from Akron, Ohio, four years ago. I was drawn to this town because of its small town charm and feel. I have worked in sales with the general public for 31 years and have never felt so mistreated in my entire life.

Please let me explain. I was awakened at 4 a.m. with smoke filling my upstairs apartment. I jumped out of bed in a panic to see if anything in the apartment could be causing the smoke. I then realized the smoke was coming up the stairwell from the downstairs apartment.

I tried knocking on the downstairs neighbor's door but his car was gone and I then called the Salem Fire Department. The fire department arrived and discovered my neighbor was home, left something cooking on the stove, and fell asleep.

The firemen seemed upset with me that I mentioned the fact that someone may not be in the apartment and there actually was, and, as if I had bothered them to even stop out because of a fire.

After being able to return to my apartment I found my apartment in disarray and my bed soaked. I understand taking precautions, but when I called the chief on Monday he said the firemen did no wrong. All I wanted was a little compassion and maybe some understanding on his part and what I received was a "that's too bad" answer. I find it unbelievable that the firemen seemed bothered by coming to a fire call, rather than maybe saving a person's life.

Not one person thanked me for calling them or acting so quickly to maybe prevent a horrible situation that could have turned tragic. I hate to think that a person in that position of saving lives takes it so lightly. I have never been treated this bad trying to do the right thing. I thought moving to a small town, people would care more, now I'm left to wonder if I made the right choice -because of the actions of a few on the Salem Fire Department.

Rick "Rodney" Anderson,

Salem

Suggestions for graffiti

To the editor:

I am writing in regard to Salem's graffiti ordinance I recently read about. I do not live in Salem but thought about how angry I would be if my own township wanted to alter the zoning code to include similar language. I would be compelled to make the following points:

First, I would suggest trading the "Beautification Committee" for a Rule of Law Committee. Second, if I hold the deed to the property and am current with the property taxes, then I am the rightful person with any say regarding the property. Third, if some punk or group of thugs puts graffiti on my fence or building, the only one violated is me, and I have the option to:

- Report the matter to the police, which should make an attempt to catch the person(s) responsible. If convicted, the judge could sentence the person(s) to clean-up or repaint my property as per my wishes.

- Load the shotgun in preparation for the next attack of creativity, when I would pepper the behind of the would-be artist with birdshot.

- Choose to do nothing. I may even decide that I like the graffiti. I would probably go with "A."

I have no issue with a group in the community that wants to help improve the looks of properties. However, I would suggest they do it as a private club. They could hold bake sales or some other way to raise money. They certainly should not use tax dollars or qualify for a 501c3.

They could offer their volunteer services to property owners who may, or may not, appreciate and accept the offer. There are many churches and groups of business owners who have offered and provided labor and materials for sprucing up properties. That is a much more neighborly and appropriate way of improving a community.

C. ANN DAVIS,

Boardman

Be thankful for veterans

To the editor:

I recently told one of my children that my U.S. Army service is the defining period of my life. Anything I have become is due to the lessons of life I learned during my military service. I served in three different eras. But this is not about me. It is about all who have served from the time of the Revolutionary War to present.

I thank God every morning when I wake up and every night before I fall asleep that I was lucky enough to be drafted in 1958. I certainly would not have even thought of enlisting. Of course, the first day in basic training that thought was completely opposite. But as each year goes by I realize more and more that serving my country was, by far, the most important thing that could have happened to me. It made me realize I had to do something meaningful with my life, and I did.

Not too long ago, my eldest grandson asked me why my two honorable discharges were hanging at the highest point on my office wall. I simply told him that if millions of people had not served and many of them given their life, none of us would have the opportunity to have a good life. I told him that what I want to be remembered for most is my military service.

Those who died to protect our freedoms and way of life, gave up all of their tomorrows so we could have our today. They are in my prayers everyday.

We honor all who have served on Memorial Day and Veterans Day but it should be every day.

So, what does it mean to be a veteran? It means to have the pride and satisfaction of having done something for the greater good. It means that anyone who has served has put the greater good above the individual and that is the honorable thing one can do.

When you see a veteran, go up to him or her and thank them for their service because you are free because of them. The only thing we want is to be recognized for our service.

God Bless our veterans and those currently serving and God bless America.

DR. MICHAEL J. TRAINA,

Salem

Kid words for Rae's Market

To the editor:

Kudos to Rae's Farm Market on Route 45 in Salem for keeping business local and affordable.

I have been buying my Halloween pumpkins there for some time now and their prices have always been reasonable. As an added bonus, they threw in some freebie pumpkins and gourds! Thank you for being "economy conscience" and helping the community enjoy the beautiful autumn holiday.

BEKI PRIDEMORE,

Salem

 
 

 

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